Posts by brothersean

St. Francis of Assisi’s Sufi Connection

Posted by on May 16, 2014 in Saint Francis of Assisi | 1 comment

“What everyone is in the eyes of God, that he is no more.”
-When St. Francis of Assisi was praised by anyone, this was his reply

Most people know that St. Francis of Assisi was a lighthearted troubadour of Italy who experienced a religious conversion and became a saint with an uncanny influence over animals and birds. It is on record that the troubadours were a relic of Saracenic musicians (Saracen, an archaic name for Muslims used by Europeans) and poets. It is often agreed that the rise and development of the monkish Orders in the middle ages was greatly influenced by the penetration of Moslem dervish organization in the West. Studying St. Francis from this point of view, certain interesting discoveries become possible.

Francis was born in 1182, the son of Pietro Bernardone, a merchant, and his wife, Madonna Pica. He was originally named Giovanni, but his father was so attached to France (where he spent much of his commercial life) that “for love of the land he had just quitted” he renamed the child Francesco.

Although considered an Italian, Francis spoke Provençal, the language used by the troubadours. There is little doubt that he felt in the spirit of the troubadours a glimpse of something deeper than appeared on the surface. St. Francis’ own poetry so strongly resembles in places that of the love poet Rumi that one is tempted to look for any report which might connect Francis with the Sufi order of the Whirling Dervishes.

Rumi’s school of Whirling Dervishes was in full operation in Asia Minor, and its founder was still alive, during the lifetime of St. Francis.

Here is the puzzling “spinning” tale:Francis was walking through Tuscany with a disciple, Brother Masseo. They arrived at a fork in the road. One path led to Florence, another to Arezzo, a third to Siena.

Masseo asked which branch they should take.”The road which God wills.”
”And which is that?” “We will know by a sign. I command you, by your path of obedience, turn round and round as children do, until I tell you to stop.”So poor Masseo twirled and twirled, till he fell down from giddiness. Then he got up and looked beseechingly at the saint; but the saint said nothing, and Masseo, remembering his vow of obedience, began again to twirl his best. He continued to twirl and to fall for some time, till he seemed to have spent all his life in twirling, when, at last, he heard the welcome words: “Stop, and tell me whither your face is turned.””To Siena,” gasped Masseo, who felt the earth rock round him. 
”

Then to Siena we must go,” said Francis, and to Siena they went. 

That Francis felt the source of his troubadour inspiration to lie in the East, and that he was connected with the Sufis, seems clear from much evidence. When he went to the Pope, trying to have his Order accepted, he used a parable which shows that he must have been thinking in terms of the orphaning of a tradition and the need to reestablish its reality.

The phrases which he uses in the parable are of Arabia, and the terminology, of a King and his court, of a woman and her sons in the desert, is not Christian but Saracen (Muslim).

“Francis,” says Bonaventura, recording an audience with Pope Innocent, “came armed with a parable. “There was, “he said, “a rich and mighty king who took to wife a poor but very beautiful woman, who lived in a desert, in whom he greatly delighted and by whom he had children who bore his image. When her sons were grown their mother said to them, “My sons, be not ashamed; ye are the children of a King.” And she sent them to the court, having supplied them with all necessaries. When they came to the King, he admired their beauty; and seeing in them some resemblance to himself, he asked them, “Whose sons are ye?” When they replied that they were the sons of a poor woman dwelling in the desert, the King, filled with much joy, said, “Fear not, ye are my sons, and if I nourish strangers at my table, how much more you, who are my legitimate children.”

The tradition that the Sufis are the esoteric Christians out of the desert, and that they are the children of a poor woman (Hagar, wife of Abraham, because of their Arab descent) fits completely with the probability that Francis had tried to explain to the Pope that the Sufi stream represented Christianity in a continuing form.

At his first meeting with the Pope, we are told, Francis did not make much impression, and he was sent away. Immediately afterward, however, the Pope had a strange dream. He saw “a palm tree gradually grow up at his feet until it grew a goodly stature, and as he gazed upon it wondering what the vision might mean, a divine illumination impressed on the mind of the Vicar of Christ that this palm tree signified the poor man whom he had that day driven from his presence.”

The palm tree is the symbol used by the Sufis, and this dream is probably the consequence of Francis using it as an analogy during his audience. .

In the early part of the thirteenth century, Pope Innocent III, convinced of the validity of the saint’s mission, granted permission for the foundation of the Minor Brothers, or Franciscans. The “Lesser Brethren,” considered to be a title assumed from pious humility, might lead one to ask whether there was any Order known as the “Greater Brethren.” If so, what might the connection be? 


The only people known in this way who were contemporary with St. Francis were the Greater Brothers, an appellation of the Sufi Order founded by Najmuddin Kubra, “the Greater.” The connection is interesting. One of the major characteristics about this great Sufi teacher was that he had an uncanny influence over animals. Pictures of him show him surrounded by birds. He tamed a fierce dog merely by looking at it – just as St. Francis is said to have cowed the wolf in a well-known tale. Najmuddin’s miracles were well known throughout the East sixty years before St. Francis was born.

When he was thirty, Francis decided to try to reach the East, and specifically Syria, which abutted upon the area of Asia Minor where the Whirling Dervishes were established. Prevented by financial troubles, he returned to Italy. Then he started out again, this time toward Morocco. He set off with a companion and traversed the whole kingdom of Aragon in Spain, though nobody can say why he did this, and some biographers are actually puzzled. Spain was very much penetrated with Sufi ideas and schools.

The atmosphere and setting of the Franciscan Order is closer to a dervish organization than anything else. Apart from the tales about St. Francis which are held in common with Sufi teachers, all kinds of points coincide. The special methodology of what Francis calls “holy prayer” indicates an affinity with the dervish “remembering,” quite apart from the whirling. The dress of the Order, with its hooded cloak and wide sleeves, is that of the dervishes of Morocco and Spain. Like the Sufi teacher Attar, Francis exchanged his garb with a mendicant. He saw a seraph with six wings, an allegory used by Sufis to convey the formula of the bismillah.

Francis refused to become a priest. Like the Sufis, he enrolled into his teaching laymen, and again like the Sufis but unlike the Church, he sought to spread the movement among all the people, in some form of affiliation. This was “the first reappearance in the Church, since its full hierarchical establishment, of the democratic element – the Christian people, as distinguished from the simple sheep to be fed, and souls to be ruled.”

The striking thing about the rules laid down by Francis was that, like the Sufis and unlike the ordinary Christians, his followers were not to think first of their own salvation. This principle is stressed again and again among the Sufis, who consider regard for personal salvation to be an expression of vanity.

He “began his preaching everywhere with the salutation which God, he said, had revealed to him – “The peace of God be with you.” This is, of course, an Islamic salutation.

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St. Francis of Assisi quotes 4 the Soul

Posted by on May 12, 2014 in Articles, Saint Francis of Assisi | 2 comments

St. Francis of Assisi quotes

“Lord, grant me the strength to accept the things I cannot change, he courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.”

Above all the grace and the gifts that Christ gives to his beloved is that of overcoming self.

For it is in giving that we receive.

Grant me the treasure of sublime poverty: permit the distinctive sign of our order to be that it does not possess anything of its own beneath the sun, for the glory of your name, and that it have no other patrimony than begging.

I have been all things unholy. If God can work through me, he can work through anyone.

If a superior give any order to one who is under him which is against that man’s conscience, although he do not obey it yet he shall not be dismissed.

If God can work through me, he can work through anyone.

If you have men who will exclude any of God’s creatures from the shelter of compassion and pity, you will have men who will deal likewise with their fellow men.

It is in pardoning that we are pardoned.

It is no use walking anywhere to preach unless our walking is our preaching.

It is not fitting, when one is in God’s service, to have a gloomy face or a chilling look.

Lord, grant that I might not so much seek to be loved as to love.

Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love.

No one is to be called an enemy, all are your benefactors, and no one does you harm. You have no enemy except yourselves.

Preach the Gospel at all times and when necessary use words.

Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible.

Where there is charity and wisdom, there is neither fear nor ignorance. 
Francis of Assisi 

Where there is injury let me sow pardon.

While you are proclaiming peace with your lips, be careful to have it even more fully in your heart.

“All the darkness in the world cannot extinguish the light of a single candle.”

“Preach the Gospel at all times and when necessary use words.”

“Start by doing what is necessary, then what is possible, and suddenly you are doing the impossible.”

“Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace. 
Where there is hatred, let me sow love, 
Where there is injury, pardon; 
Where there is doubt, faith; 
Where there is despair, hope; 
Where there is darkness, light; 
And where there is sadness, joy. 
O Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek 
to be consoled as to console, 
to be understood as to understand, 
to be loved, as to love. 
For it is in giving that we receive, 
It is in pardoning that we are pardoned, 
and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life.” 
― St. Francis of Assisi “The deeds you do may be the only sermon some persons will hear today” St. Francis of Assisi “He who works with his hands is a laborer. He who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman. He who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.” St. Francis of Assisi “Preach the gospel always, and when absolutely necessary, use words.” St. Francis of Assisi “Remember that when you leave this earth, you can take with you nothing that have received–only what you have given.” St. Francis of Assisi “No one is to be called an enemy, all are your benefactors, and no one does you harm. You have no enemy except yourselves.” St. Francis of Assisi “I have been all things unholy. If God can work through me, He can work through anyone.” 
St. Francis of Assisi “True progress quietly and persistently moves along without notice.” St. Francis of Assisi “Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace. Where these is hatred, let me sow love.” St. Francis of Assisi “Keep trying to do what is necessary, then what’s possible and suddenly you’re doing the impossible.” St. Francis of Assisi “While you are proclaiming peace with your lips, be careful to have it even more fully in your heart.” St. Francis of Assisi “Lord make me an instrument of your peace, 
Where there is hatred let me sow love. 
Where there is injury, pardon. 
Where there is doubt, faith. 
Where there is despair, hope. 
Where there is darkness, light. 
And where there is sadness, joy. 

O divine master grant that I may 
Not so much seek to be consoled as to console; 
To be understood as to understand; 
To be loved as to love 
For it is in giving that we receive- 
It is in pardoning that we are pardoned. 
And its in dying that we are born to eternal life. 
Amen.” 
St. Francis of Assisi “If you have men who will exclude any of God’s creatures from the shelter of compassion and pity, you will have men who will deal likewise with their fellow men.” St. Francis of Assisi “Nor did demons crucify Him; it is you who have crucified Him and crucify Him still, when you delight in your vices and sins. ” St. Francis of Assisi “Sanctify yourself and you will sanctify society.” St. Francis of Assisi “For it is in giving that we receive.” St. Francis of Assisi “Above all the grace and the gifts that Christ gives to his beloved is that of overcoming self.” 
St. Francis of Assisi “We have been called to heal wounds, to unite what has fallen apart, and to bring home those who have lost their way.” St. Francis of Assisi “A single sunbeam is enough to drive away many shadows” St. Francis of Assisi “preach the gospel always, use words if necessary ” St. Francis of Assisi “Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible.” St. Francis of Assisi “When you are proclaiming peace with your lips, be careful to have it even 
more fully in your heart.” St. Francis of Assisi “I have sinned against my brother the ass.” St. Francis of Assisi “All the darkness of the world cannot extinguish the light of a small candle.” St. Francis of Assisi “O Divine Master, grant that I may not seek to be consoled, as to console. To be understood, as to understand. To be loved, as to love. For it is in giving that we receive. It is in pardoning that we are pardoned. It is in dying that we are born to eternal life.” St. Francis of Assisi

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A Franciscan World View ?

Posted by on May 12, 2014 in Articles, Franciscan Spirituality | 0 comments

What is a worldview?

According to Loretta Abbott she states that, ‘Every person has a worldview. Here’s how some have defined it: “How we view the world. Our ideas about the world that determine how we live, decisions we make, and our response to others.

The ideas we have that determine our thoughts, decisions, and actions.” (Rewired Worldview Curriculum by Chuck Colson and Teen Mania) “A worldview is your belief system – a total way of looking at the world, the way you understand reality, or what the world is all about.

A worldview is the ‘Big Picture’ of life, and it is a coherent view that gives meaning to the individual pieces of your life.” (Worldviews in Focus: Thinking Like a Christian by David Nobel and Chuck Edwards) In other words, your worldview is what you believe, which in turn affects your value system which then determines your behaviour and actions.’

Jesus is the basis of a Christian worldview. “So then, just as you received Christ Jesus as Lord, continue to live in him, rooted and built up in him, strengthened in the faith as you were taught, and overflowing with thankfulness. See to it that no one takes you captive through hollow and deceptive philosophy, which depends on human tradition and the basic principles of this world rather than on Christ.” Colossians 2:6-8

Saint Francis is the basis of a Franciscan Interfaith Worldview. The updated Franciscan worldview may be perceived by many Catholic Christians who are ‘set in their religious belief,’ as nothing more than an over indulgence in a New Age philosophy that has no relevance for followers of Saint Francis.

To adopt the Franciscan worldview, the soul needs to be open and receptive to the promptings of the Holy Spirit of Divine Love that enriches the soul with ‘regular updates’ using modern technology such as the Internet Highway, to convey the word of God to those who have ‘ears to hear and receive God’s Truth.’

I believe that at the very heart of Franciscan Spirituality there is an acceptance that our Creator God has both male and female energy as evident by the reference to, ‘Our Holy Father Mother God.’ Saint Francis approached God through simplicity and humility and his spiritual life was greatly inspired by His Master Jesus.

This selfless, reverent spiritual love affair that both men shared on a purely spiritual level became the sole driving force behind many of the teachings that Saint Francis wrote for his followers to adopt in their search for God through simplicity and humility. The intense spiritual live affair that engulfed the soul of Saint Francis became so intense that finally he was given the stigmata, or same hallmarks of his crucified Lord, Jesus Christ.

In his personal faith journey, Saint Francis acknowledged against the teachings of his Church, the presence of both the Divine Feminine, Mary Magdalene as well as the Masculine energies of Jesus. Yes, he had a devotion to Mother Mary but he knew that as Magdalene was the ‘Beloved Disciple, whom Jesus loved,’ he restored allegiance to balancing both energies and avoided the route of adherence to the traditional doctrines imposed by the Catholic Church.

Franciscan spirituality embraces a new concept of balance, harmony and divine connectedness by not only acknowledging the presence of the Divine Feminine but also shows a great reverence to Mother Earth and all creation as noted in the respected ‘Canticle of the Creatures.’

The spirituality of Saint Francis embraced a ‘New World Order’ of four important ecologies that would challenge the entire Christian world of that era to the present day. Instead of adhering to the Roman Catholic view point, Saint Francis adopted the Catholic or Universal view that as children of the same loving God/dess, we are all one in the eyes of God.

Here we have the birth of interfaith dialogue between Saint Francis and Jesus seeking reconciliation for all mankind to be as one, just as Jesus is with His Father Mother God. Franciscan Spirituality takes the cry of Jesus from the cross to his heart, ‘Father, I pray that they will be one as You and I are One.’ The wearing of the Tau symbol is a daily reminder of God’s cry for the unity and reconciliation of all faiths and none to unite as one spiritual family in God for God.

The Tau symbol represents our arms outstretched in prayerful supplication to God for that unity.

Franciscan Spirituality is an Ecology for Soul Seekers Everywhere.

Francis of Assisi, in his living the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the full, gives us an example of ‘Four Ecologies: an environmental ecology, living in harmony with creation and Mother Nature and the Elements.

  • a social ecology, embracing all people as brothers and sisters regardless of colour, race or status.
  • a spiritual ecology, in praise of the Father Mother God as Creator of all things.
  • an interfaith ecology, inviting all soul seekers of truth enter a new concept of living practical spirituality in the modern world regardless of one’s religious persuasions.

The Tau Community of Saint Francis is a ‘Virtual Interfaith Spiritual Community of ordinary men and women who have heard the call of Saint Francis speaking to their hearts about how they can be of service to the same loving God as they seek to express and share this ‘integrated spiritual vision/ecology’ for the sake of and out of love for God’s world by providing the following:

۞ a vehicle whereby mankind can embrace religious diversity without 
 compromising one’s spiritual values as they search for lasting peace and 
 reconciliation of all Faiths to unite as ‘One Spiritual Family’ sharing
 God’s love for all and to all

۞ a unique concept of sharing God’s Love through a common sensed 
 approach of putting practical religious/spirituality into positive action 
 for all who are seeking peace where mutual respect is essential for the 
 integration of all faiths/beliefs.

۞ a spiritual monastic community, (a monastery without walls) based on the 
 core values of Franciscan Spirituality, where the Creator God is Love 
 and by inviting all to come and share that love as brothers and sisters by 
 embracing a ‘spiritual way life,’ from the comforts of their own home.

۞ an online network providing spiritual support for those in need of spiritual 
 guidance and daily prayer.

۞ An online network providing spiritual information for those who are 
 guided by God to advance their spiritual life further.

The Franciscan worldview of entering a ‘Franciscan spiritual retreat’ for personal soul development, entails a spiritual journey of re-treating from the world for a closer personal relationship with one’s God/Dess.

The teachings of Saint Francis are rooted in both the ancient and modern concepts of God as demonstrated by the Essenes, Druids, Celts, to name but a few. Though the Catholic/Christian Churches down through the centuries have added their own perception of how they perceived the soul’s journey for a ‘religious/mystical’ experience, it would suggest that they have focused to a great extent more on the individual/s adopting their dogmatic teachings as emphasised in Canon Law. On the other hand, it is regrettable that the New Age Movement have liberalised and apparently trivialised the simplicity and integrity of the 12th century man of God, Saint Francis of Assisi.

In every generation God summons ordinary men and women to take on the might of the ‘Religious and Civil Authorities’ who shackle God’s people with their agendas to coerce and default on offering to God what is rightfully Gods’.

I believe that Saint Francis was chosen by God to repair the damage caused to by His chosen representatives in the 12th century. Who could have imagined that a group of ordinary men and women disguised as a peasants under the leadership of Saint Francis could effectively change the course of spirituality.

Because of the imposing threat from their reverence for God, their humility and fellowship soon began to spread from the fields and valleys of the Italian landscapes to the very heart of the Catholic Church in Rome itself. Clearly, it was never the intention for Saint Francis to establish a monastic community, God had other plans for this vibrant breath of Divine Love that was attracting thousands and millions of followers away from the corrupt Church to serving God by embracing the ordinariness and simplicity of a fulfilled life in union with Mother Earth, the animal kingdom as demonstrated by the Canticle of the Creatures and the love that Saint Francis afforded to his beloved Brother Sun and Sister Moon.

In this age of religious disquiet and public unrest, mankind it would seem has lost its way and has become ‘spiritually impoverished’ whilst desperately seeking clarity to the mayhem and confusion perpetrated by the many false prophets of gloom and doom who sell their wares and whose sole aim is to enslave the innocent and vulnerable into their schools of false ideology that denies the very existence of God or a Supreme Being that is known by many other different names.

Saint Francis is perceived by many who are involved in the ‘Interfaith Arena’ as the Founding Father of Peace and Unity of all faiths and none. He demonstrated a way of life as opposed to standing in a pulpit and screaming at God’s children to live in fear of a loving God. Instead, Saint Francis opened his arms to everyone regardless of their status in the local community.

His intense love for God was a hand’s on love as demonstrated by his active care and support of lepers. His wisdom spread far afield and soon he was seen as a ‘man of God’ who reflected the face of His Master Jesus. His spirituality was soon labelled ‘Franciscan Spirituality’ and has attracted many thousands of men and women to forsake the worldly pleasures for the cloistered life. Why?

Today, the spirit of Saint Francis is alive not just at his birthplace of Assisi, but has found a new spiritual watering hole ‘The Celtic Assisi of the South Lakes. At the Monastery of Saint Francis, we not only honour and respect the 12th century traditional teachings of Saint Francis as well as all other Faith traditions that lives to the spirit of embracing God/Dess through the Natural World- The Franciscan Soul of Simplicity, Peace, Integrity and Simplicity which unites our hearts as lay monastic’s of the Tau Community of Interfaith Franciscans. www.interfaithfranciscans.com

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Making an online Celtic Franciscan Retreat

Posted by on May 12, 2014 in Articles, Retreats | 0 comments

Making a Celtic Franciscan Retreat

Led by Brother Sean 

So, what does a Franciscan Retreat consist of?

Firstly, it embraces the Divine within your soul and instead of feeling afraid of the Divine, there is an insatiable longing within the soul to return to its’ spiritual home.

As with all faith journeys, there is a sense of real expectancy to receive a miracle and live in an eternal euphoric state of mind.

Franciscan spirituality is unlike anything else! It is spirituality that is practical, accessible, effortless and affordable for all who ask for it.

It embraces the ancient principles and values of all the world’s major religions placing an emphasis, not on academia, but more on giving the heart permission to breathe and Be!

A Franciscan retreat in the 21st century is an encounter with God that has no beginning or end. It is open and yet, it is endless for the soul in search of clarity and truth.

Unlike many other retreats, a Franciscan retreat has no stipulations other than come with an ‘open mind to receive’ and that your heart is ready to dance the ‘sacred dance’ with Mother Earth, her helpers and friends of the animal kingdom.

When the soul takes responsibility to actively engage in such an experience, Saint Francis walks alongside each and every soul as it enters the cathedral of Mother Nature’s domain. There, the birds become the eternal choristers chanting the praises to God.

The animal kingdom patiently waits for us to join them in song too. All that they ask is that we reverently respect that they too have a rightful place with mankind in their search for a more peaceful and loving world that recognises God as their Creator.

The senses have an important part to play in acknowledging the beauty of all creation.

Holism and Alternatives play an equal part in our self healing process.

K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple Server) is the key that unlocks the very heart of God in all creation.

The Angelic Messengers of the Four Spheres as represented in the Angel (Feng Shui) Healing Bagua. A sacred tool given to Brother Sean in 1999 as a self healing tool to overcome the impact of severe mental illness using colour and plant essences.

Creating a sacred space to rest, play and enjoy being a co creator or child of God.

Embracing the seasons and their gifts.

Connecting with the energies associated with the Divine Feminine (Magdalene) and with the Divine Masculine (Jesus Christ). Both energies when combined as one create balance, harmony and Divine Connectedness within the soul.

Honouring the responses from the heart as coming from God.

Discourages the use of NLP (Neuro Linguistic Programming), or similar techniques that control the heart to deny channeled messages from Source.

The ancient teachings of the Essenes to re-programme the mind and bring it into subjection of the heart centre. Embracing the positive view-point within all religious faith teachings that will enable the heart embrace a God of live not fear. Using all that Mother Nature provides for us and adopting a more holistic, alternative approach to wellness and wholeness.

Embracing an eco friendly understanding of the Earth. Adhering to the earth’s code. Adopting the Tree of Life and the symbolism of the 7 Branches and 7 Roots connecting mankind with the sacred healing energies of Heaven and Earth.

Working with all groups who show respect for the diversity of the human being.

A Franciscan Retreat really does provide the soul with:

Joy.

Liberation.

Clarity.

Freedom.

Reverence.

Respect.

Humility.

Spiritual Abundance.

Prosperity Consciousness

A clearer understanding of the differences between religion and spirituality.

A desire to want to actively engage with God and creation as part of one’s faith journey.

The desire to surrender and submit one’s ego, dreams and aspirations to God in service for the whole family of God’s creation to be liberated and set free of ‘self.’

When can one make such a retreat?

A Celtic Franciscan retreat can be made at any time online or by Telephone.

What to do now?

For information about making an online Franciscan retreat with Brother Sean, please direct your enquiries to brothersean@btinternet.com

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Quotes from Saint Francis of Assisi

Posted by on May 12, 2014 in Articles, Saint Francis of Assisi | 0 comments

Above all the grace and the gifts that Christ gives to his beloved is that of overcoming self. 
Francis of Assisi

For it is in giving that we receive. 
Francis of Assisi

Grant me the treasure of sublime poverty: permit the distinctive sign of our order to be that it does not possess anything of its own beneath the sun, for the glory of your name, and that it have no other patrimony than begging. 
Francis of Assisi

I have been all things unholy. If God can work through me, he can work through anyone. 
Francis of Assisi

If a superior give any order to one who is under him which is against that man’s conscience, although he do not obey it yet he shall not be dismissed. 
Francis of Assisi

If you have men who will exclude any of God’s creatures from the shelter of compassion and pity, you will have men who will deal likewise with their fellow men. 
Francis of Assisi

It is in pardoning that we are pardoned. 
Francis of Assisi

It is no use walking anywhere to preach unless our walking is our preaching. 
Francis of Assisi

It is not fitting, when one is in God’s service, to have a gloomy face or a chilling look. 
Francis of Assisi

Lord, grant that I might not so much seek to be loved as to love. 
Francis of Assisi

Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love. 
Francis of Assisi

No one is to be called an enemy, all are your benefactors, and no one does you harm. You have no enemy except yourselves. 
Francis of Assisi

Preach the Gospel at all times and when necessary use words. 
Francis of Assisi

Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible. 
Francis of Assisi 

Where there is charity and wisdom, there is neither fear nor ignorance. 
Francis of Assisi

Where there is injury let me sow pardon. 
Francis of Assisi 

While you are proclaiming peace with your lips, be careful to have it even more fully in your heart. 
Francis of Assisi

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